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I dont remember which quad mag i was reading, but they were doing a review of the top 8 sport quads and one of the downers on the predator was that it didnt wheelie well. Well i just got mine and all i got to say is that just aint true. Im 6'2" 250 lbs and i leaned as far forward as i could and it still pulled a monster wheelie, and that was in mud.
 

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Dude, you have the best signature I have ever seen!!!!!!! lol..lol..lol..lol..
 

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hey im with loften the predator is a good wheelie bike.
 

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I think they were saying it was hard to ride a wheelie through the gears, which is still wrong, I can ride a wheelie 1st through 4th gear whick kinda gets scary when you start hitting bumps and go back and forth between your two back tires at that speed.
 

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**** you guys are good..Im too worried about going back over on myself..im just starting to get used to popping it up and keeping it there for more then a second or two!
 

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The reason the Predator doesn't wheelie as well as some other bikes is partly due to the anti-squat rear suspension geometry. As the bike accelerates, weight is transfered to the rear suspension. This happens on any object, and what we are interested in is how the rear suspension reacts. A great example is Monster Trucks, because they are so big and changes are so easily visible. If you watch a monster truck accelerate, the body "squats", which basically means that the weight being transfered rearward is being absorbed by the springs and it causes them to compress..therefore lowering the entire rear end. This suspension design has no anti-squat designed in it and is very ineffecitve.

A properly designed rear suspension will incorporate at least some anti-squat. What happens with anti-squat in the rear suspension is that the weight being transfered to the back of the vehicle is sent through the suspension links instead of the springs. So, instead of the weight being transfered to the rear springs it ends up being transfered to the tire contact patches thereby increasing traction. There are varying degrees to how much anti-squat suspension s have but any is much better than none.

If you try to do a wheelie, the lower the rear end is the easier it will be to pull one, this is why it is so much easier to do a wheelie going up hill. So, if your accelerating and your rear suspension isn't squating(because your getting more traction), it will be harder to pull a wheelie. It's just that the magazine guys are too conceded to realize they might not understand why.

This same principle can be applied to the front suspension, except that it is called anti-dive. When you are braking, instead of weight being transfered to the springs causing the whole front end to "dive"(springs compressing), it is transfered as increased pressure on the tire contact patch.

CJ
 

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that is the best description of anti squat i have heard yet CJ. you can get a wheelie out of the predator very easy just by ajusting your rear shock a little to get the rear to squat.
 

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Great explanation CJ. I believe I read in ATVSport Magazine that it was indeed tougher to wheelie the Predator than competitive models, but that there was plenty of power on hand to wheelie if the rider WANTED it to do so. Their analysis was right on, as the Predator's anti-squat suspension does work, but if I want it too....I can ride a wheelie all day long.
 

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Yeah I totally agree. I was just commenting on why wheeling a predator might be harder than othe quads, i can wheelie no problem too!

CJ
 
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